Other (less mobile) highlights from the Boston Local Food Festival 2011
Stone Hearth Pizza team

By Hairee Lee

Here were my stationary favorites form the BLFF 2011:

Sofra, Bakery and Café

Sofra has an incredibly appetizing booth, laden with pastries by Maura Kilpatrick, pastry chef at Sofra. I find out from Janice Goldsmith, Marking /events coordinator Oleana ((I went to Oleana this past Sunday for my first year anniversary with my boyfriend. We'd been wanting to go there for a while. And it was worth the wait. The food was sensational.)) & Sofra, that Sofra is owned by the same people who own Oleana, the critically acclaimed Arabic/Mediterranean restaurant in Cambridge, MA.

Where do they get their ingredients? Jennifer tells me the pumpkin in one of their pastries is from Siena Farms, owned by the owners of Oleana (these guys are really local) and local cheeses and produce.


Stone Hearth Pizza

I'm drawn to the meatballs. I've been trying to ignore it but they just keep calling me. I love everything about meatballs: the ground beef, the fat, the spices, the Jersey Shore reference it has for me. These particular meatballs are by Stone Hearth Pizza, co-owned by Jonathan Schwarz and Christopher Robbins

Located in in Belmont, Needham, and Cambridge, they're about to open yet another location in Allston, which I'm betting will be a huge success given the proclivity of the Allston demographic for minced meat sandwiches.

Alex Chamberlain, the "marketing gal” as she describes herself, tells me, "These guys are atypical of pizza restaurants b/c everything is house made all from scratch, all whole ingredients." A far cry form the frozen dough and who-knows-where-it-was-made sauce of Domino's. They make everything using local beef, cheese, produce, and offer craft brews. This pizza place sounds like pie heaven.


Purefections

Owned and created by sisters, Christina Barkus and Lisas Trifone born and raised in Quincy, Purefections has their store front in Quincy, MA.

Their store is almost 5 years old, but with features on the Food Network and Phantom Gourmet and most recently their mouthwatering feature on Unique Sweets (you can find the video link to the show on the PUREFECTION website) they're a local business going strong.

P&#178c&#178 is made with potato chips, peanut butter, caramel, and high quality Belgian chocolate, a recipe by Christina. Why "P&#178c&#178"?

“Because the it stand for peanut butter and potato chips, and the c&#178 is for caramel and chocolate. And it’s also in the form of a square so the p squared, c squared," says Joey.

Donny informs me that PUREFECTION take orders from across the country. Or sometimes the chocoholics come to them.

“We’ve had people drive from Indiana come to our store to try our chocolate.”

With an endorsement like that I buy one. Chocolaty, salty, caramel-y. It's delicious. But worth $3 per square that isn’t even bigger than the palm of my hand? I don’t know. But then again, I’m not a chocoholic, so I might not be the right person to say one way or the other. For instance, I wouldn't drive from Indiana all the way to Boston and consider PUREFECTION a tourist destination.

But again, I'm not a chocoholic. I would, however, consider other kinds of food destinations as a tourist attraction. But moving on...


Ula Café

Ula Café is co-owned by Korinn Koslofsky, who I meet today, and Kate Bancroft located in Jamaica Plain, MA.

"It's a real JP establishment, everyone in JP is really familiar with us, but a lot of people walking by who aren’t familiar withJP haven’t heard of us."

This cafe and bakery, located in the brewery in JP where Sam Adams' brewery is, opened 4 years ago this past June as Korinn and Kate's answer to their love of baking. They started the café that offers lunch staples like soups and sandwiches and salads, but their passion lies in baking.

Their seasonally flavored loaf cakes are delicious. They almost make me wish I lived in JP. Almost. Hopefully they'll start thinking about heading north and into Cambridge territory, where the coolest people live. Except for Ula people, of course.